Growth rate, haematology and serum biochemistry of broilers fed diets supplemented with choline chloride

Authors

  • Patience C. UGWU University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Chinelo N. UJU University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Chinwe J. ARONU University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Anne MORGAN University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Glory SUNDAY University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Chinenye AHAMEFULA University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Obinna IDIGOH University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State
  • Chuka EZEMA University of Nigeria, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Animal Health and Production, Nsukka, Enugu State

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55779/nsb14411324

Keywords:

broilers, cholinechloride, growth, haematology, serum biochemistry

Abstract

The study evaluated the effect of choline chloride (CC) supplementation on growth rate, haematology and serum biochemistry of broilers. 120-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into four groups of 30 birds each and these were further sub-divided into 3 replicates of 10 birds each. Group A served as the control while the diets of groups B, C and D were supplemented with 0.5 g/kg, 0.75 g/kg and 1 g/kg of CC respectively. 6weeks post-supplementation, haematology, serum biochemistry, total weight gain, feed efficiency and carcass characteristics were determined. Group C (0.75 g/kg choline) had a significantly (p<0.05) higher feed efficiency (49.18%) than other choline-supplemented groups and control. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the mean values of AST, ALT, total protein and creatinine across all groups. However, the ALP and cholesterol values of group D (4.42 U/L and 1.68 mg/dl respectively) were significantly (p<0.05) higher than other groups. Lymphocyte counts of Group D was significantly (p<0.05) lower than all other groups. The spleen weight (0.27 g) of group D was significantly (p<0.05) higher than all other groups, but there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the relative weights of other organs of all four groups. The values of the breast weight/width, drumstick length/width, wing length and carcass length did not vary significantly across the supplemented-groups, but the breast-length, thigh weight/length/width, drumstick-weight, wing weight/width and carcass-weight of the control group were significantly higher than the supplemented-groups. Choline chloride supplementation at 0.75 g/kg may have contributed to improved feed efficiency but not with a corresponding excellent carcass yield.

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Published

2022-11-28

How to Cite

UGWU, P. C. ., UJU, C. N. ., ARONU, C. J. ., MORGAN, A. ., SUNDAY, G. ., AHAMEFULA, C. ., IDIGOH, O. ., & EZEMA, C. . (2022). Growth rate, haematology and serum biochemistry of broilers fed diets supplemented with choline chloride. Notulae Scientia Biologicae, 14(4), 11324. https://doi.org/10.55779/nsb14411324

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Research articles

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