Diversity and abundance of butterfly as an environmental indicator at Dinhata Subdivision, Cooch Behar, West Bengal, India

  • Gobinda C. ROY Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN) https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1856-3146
  • Adam MIAH Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN)
  • Surovi ROY Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN)
  • Debodatta ROY Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN)
  • Debapriya KAR Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN)
  • Siddharthasankar BANERJEE Burdwan Raj College, Department of Zoology, Purba Burdwan, 713 104, West Bengal (IN)
  • Manjil GUPTA Dinhata College, Department of Zoology, Coochbehar, 736135, West Bengal (IN) https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9763-0217
Keywords: biodiversity, butterfly, conservation, Cooch Behar, Dinhata, Lepidoptera

Abstract

Butterflies are concerned with scrupulous ecosystem’s productivity. Their diversity and richness indicate affluence in natural variety and resource cock-and-bull story. The present study reports 40 butterfly species of 5 families, which were obtained from an investigation conducted over a period of six months, from June 2020 to November 2020, in five different areas of Dinhata subdivision, West Bengal, India, via camera photography documentation, visual observation and by confined populace. Out of 40 species, 18 species belong to Nymphalidae, 9 species belong to Pieridae, 9 species belong to Lycaenidae, 3 species belong to Papilionidae, and 1 species belongs to Hesperiidae correspondingly. Nymphalidae was recorded as the most prevailing family owing to their species richness and greater abundance than the others. Alpha diversity indices and Whittaker’s Beta Diversity indices were calculated for all the sites. Pollinator butterflies’ abundance and diversity were not deliberated in the past at the above region. On the whole, in this task, we endeavoured to estimate the diversity of butterflies, but no scientific observation was done here to explicate how their richness and diversity in reality have an effect on natural production.

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Published
2022-03-21
How to Cite
ROY, G. C., MIAH, A., ROY, S., ROY, D., KAR, D., BANERJEE, S., & GUPTA, M. (2022). Diversity and abundance of butterfly as an environmental indicator at Dinhata Subdivision, Cooch Behar, West Bengal, India. Notulae Scientia Biologicae, 14(1), 11156. https://doi.org/10.15835/nsb14111156
Section
Research articles
CITATION
DOI: 10.15835/nsb14111156