Microbial assessment and proximate composition of bread samples collected from different bakeries in Ogbomoso, Oyo state, Nigeria

  • Segun S. OJO Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Department of Food Science and Engineering, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
  • Adekunle O. ADEOYE Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Department of Food Science and Engineering, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
  • Adeladun S. AJALA Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Department of Food Science and Engineering, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
  • Iyabo C. OLADIPO Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Department of Science, Laboratory of Technology, Ogbomoso, Oyo State
Keywords: antimicrobial; bread; contamination; inhibition and safety

Abstract

Bread is a staple food in Nigeria and establishment of bakeries depend on the financial capacity and processing technique employed by processors. This has led to various breads in terms of nutrition and asepsis. In this study, three types of ready-to-eat bread were purchased from different bakery retail shops in Ogbomoso, Nigeria. The control sample was prepared in Food Science Department, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Ogbomoso. These samples were analyzed for proximate composition, bacterial and fungal contamination using standard microbial procedure (SMP) and disc diffusion method (DDM) for sensitivity test to investigate safety handling practices during production, distribution and anti-microbial effect on microbial contaminant.  The results of microbial analysis are as follows: total viable count (1.1 x103 - 4.5x103) cfu/g, coliform count (0-1.9x103) cfu/g, and mold count (0.3x 105 -3.7x105) cfu/g. The percentage of organisms isolated were E. coli. 15%, B. subtilis and S. aureus 20%, P. aureginosa 10%, S. cerevisiae 15.77%, R. stolonifer 13.46%, Mucor spp. and A. niger 18.08%, and P. notatum 7.69%. The result of the proximate analysis was as follows: protein (9.13- 9.79%), crude fat (1.64-4.50%), ash (1.32-1.77%), crude fibre (0.10-0.23%), moisture content (27.22 -29.05%) and carbohydrate (55.89-59.40%). The most sensitive antimicrobial agent was gentamycin across treatment. The organisms restricted septrin, augmenting, and chloramphenicol completely. Bacillus subtilis has the highest zone of inhibition with the use of gentamycin.

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Published
2021-03-09
How to Cite
OJO, S. S., ADEOYE , A. O., AJALA, A. S., & OLADIPO, I. C. (2021). Microbial assessment and proximate composition of bread samples collected from different bakeries in Ogbomoso, Oyo state, Nigeria. Notulae Scientia Biologicae, 13(1), 10873. https://doi.org/10.15835/nsb13110873
Section
Research articles
CITATION
DOI: 10.15835/nsb13110873